127th Boston Marathon complete coverage, results

“Truly special,” “excited,” “best win ever,” and “thankful” were some of the ways the winners of the 127th Boston Marathon described their historic victories in Monday’s race. Kenya’s defending champion Evans Sebet won the men’s category on Monday with a time of 2:05:54. “Twice. To win twice is a very unusual event. I was very happy at the finish line yesterday.” Sebet is the first man to retain his title in Boston since Robert Seriot did in 2008. VIDEO BELOW: Sebet wins second straight Boston Marathon men’s title VIDEO BELOW The race clocks in at 2:21:38, completing the Kenyan sweep. It was his first appearance in Boston and his first marathon win. Obiri, the only woman in history to win world titles in indoor and outdoor track and cross country, said she wasn’t sure if she wanted to race because her heart was elsewhere, “but her coach convinced her to join the talented Boston field. “It was my best win. I shouldn’t be here to race,” he said, having only committed to hosting Boston three weeks ago. “I’m going to do my best. And I was surprised to win yesterday. I worked hard in this race. I was very strong to win this race yesterday. I was very strong to win this race yesterday.” VIDEO BELOW: Obiri doesn’t run Boston Marathon VIDEO BELOW: Obiri breaks the tape first in the women’s division to win the 127th Women’s Wheelchair Division American Susannah Scaroni overcomes equipment problems Monday’s Boston Marathon unofficial time of 1:41:45.” This year really stood out for me, I did it on all levels. But this year, the crowd really energized me in many areas. At the race, especially on Boylston Street, I felt like I was being pushed down the street, and it was great to be a part of this 10-year anniversary to see the community come back so strong. ,” she said. Scaroni, 31, of Urbana, Illinois, captured her first Boston victory despite being forced to pull over to the side of Natick Street to fix a wheel. “I’ve just learned in my long career. Be better, better prepared and equipped, so I didn’t have an Allen key before during the Chicago Marathon,” she said. “So I was very grateful to have it with me yesterday.” Video below: Women’s wheelchair winner in wheelchair stops to get wheel fixed Men’s The wheelchair division timed 1:17:06, which set a new course record.Hugh, nicknamed Silver Bullet, broke the 2017 Boston Marathon course record of 1:18:04.Hugh, a six-time Boston Marathon champion, is currently a Paralympic marathoner. gold medalist. wheelchair competitors Light rain causes racers’ gloves to slip on wheels.” It was very special yesterday. Even after a good night’s sleep, I’m still in the process of realizing what happened yesterday with the lesson plan,” he hugged. “I never thought it was possible under these circumstances. But yesterday was a great day.” VIDEO BELOW: MARCEL HUGH CAME TO SIXTH BOSTON MARATHON VICTORY BELOW: ‘It feels incredible’: Hugh wins 6th Boston title in men’s wheelchair field More than 30,000 athletes compete in world’s oldest annual marathon, which Celebrates the spirit of community and the pursuit of athletic excellence and includes entrants from 122 countries and all 50 U.S. states.Video Recap: 127th Boston Marathon

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“Truly special,” “excited,” “best win ever,” and “thankful” were some of the ways the winners of the 127th Boston Marathon described their historic victories in Monday’s race.

Defending champion Evans Sebet of Kenya won the men’s race on Monday in 2:05:54.

“I thank God. This is my second time. I won twice. I was happy at the finish line yesterday,” Sebet said. “Twice. To win twice is a very unusual event. I was very happy at the finish line yesterday.”

Sebet is the first man to defend his title in Boston since Robert Seriot did in 2008.

Video below: Sebet wins Boston Marathon men’s title for second time

Video below: Sebet crosses the line to take 2nd Boston Marathon title

Kenya’s Helen Obiri won the women’s section of the race in 2:21:38, completing the Kenyan sweep. It was his first appearance in Boston and his first marathon win.

Obiri, the only woman in history to win world titles in both indoor and outdoor track and cross country, wasn’t sure if she wanted to race because her heart was elsewhere, but her coach convinced her to join the talented Boston field.

“This is my best win. I shouldn’t be here to race,” he said, having only committed to hosting Boston three weeks ago. “I’m going to do my best. And I was surprised to win yesterday. I worked hard for this match. I was mentally very strong and focused on winning yesterday’s match.

Video below: Opry almost didn’t run the Boston Marathon

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Video below: Opiri breaks the tape first in the women’s category

American Susanna Scaroni overcame equipment problems with an unofficial time of 1:41:45 in the women’s wheelchair division of the 127th Boston Marathon on Monday.

“This year really stood out for me, I did it in all stages. But this year, for many parts of the race, especially on Boyston Street, people really gave me energy. Pushed on the street, it’s great to be a part of seeing the community come back so strong for this 10-year anniversary. It was fun,” he said.

Scaroni, 31, of Urbana, Illinois, captured his first Boston victory despite being forced to pull over to the side of the street at Nautic to fix a wheel.

“Throughout my long career I’ve learned now how to be better, better prepared and equipped, so I don’t have the Allen key I had before during the Chicago Marathon,” he said. “So I was very grateful to have it with me yesterday.”

Video below: The winner stands to adjust the wheel on a women’s wheelchair

Video below: Scaroni overcomes equipment issues to win

Scaroni finished second in the 2018 and 2022 Boston Marathons and finished third in 2014, 2015 and 2017 and fifth in 2019.

In the men’s wheelchair category, Switzerland’s Marcel Hug set a new course record with a time of 1:17:06. Hugh, nicknamed the Silver Bullet, broke the Boston Marathon course record in 2017 with a time of 1:18:04.

Hugh is now a six-time Boston Marathon champion and a Paralympic marathon gold medalist.

Wheelchair competitors braved light rain, causing racers’ gloves to slip on the wheels.

“It was very special yesterday. Even after a good night’s sleep, I’m still working on making sense of what happened yesterday with the lesson log,” Hough said. “I never thought it was possible under these circumstances. But yesterday was a great day.”

VIDEO BELOW: Marcel Hug captures sixth Boston Marathon win

Video below: ‘It feels unbelievable’: Hough wins 6th Boston title in men’s wheelchair

A field of more than 30,000 athletes took part in the world’s oldest annual marathon, which celebrates community spirit and the pursuit of athletic excellence and includes entrants from 122 countries and all 50 US states.

Video recap: 127th Boston Marathon

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