Biden Takes Democratic Nomination, Trump Behind: NPR

President Joe Biden, left, on Jan. 5, with Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump, right, on Jan. 19.

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President Joe Biden, left, on Jan. 5, with Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump, right, on Jan. 19.

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with a win GeorgiaIn the presidential primary Tuesday night, President Biden has enough delegates to formally claim the Democratic nomination for president in the 2024 general election, according to the AP.

While securing the nomination is a formality for an incumbent president, it prevents any challenger to Biden and allows the campaign to show broad solidarity among Democratic primary voters.

Biden didn't face much opposition; A push to vote “undecided” or submit a blank ballot or take similar action in several states, including battleground states like Michigan and North Carolina. It doesn't pose a challenge to Biden's nomination, but it does show that voters with major concerns about a second Biden term are not insignificant.

In Biden's response to securing the nomination, he attacked his rival, former President Donald Trump.

“Despite the challenges we faced when I took office, we are in the midst of a comeback: wages are rising faster than inflation, jobs are coming back, consumer confidence is up,” Biden said. “Amidst this progress, we face a sobering reality: Freedom and democracy are at risk at home like they have not been since the Civil War. Donald Trump is waging a campaign of hate, vengeance and revenge. America.”

Tuesday is the earliest Trump can win enough delegates to clinch the Republican nomination — he may have to wait another week.

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Voting also ends on Tuesday Mississippi And Washington condition. Hawaii Republicans compete in caucuses and Democrats overseas and in the Northern Mariana Islands.

As of Tuesday, Biden was estimated to have 1,866 of the 1,968 delegates needed to clinch the Democratic nomination. There are 254 delegates at stake in the March 12 Democratic contests, and Biden won all six from the Northern Mariana Islands on Tuesday morning.

Trump has an estimated 1,089 delegates, needs 1,215 to clinch the nomination, or 137 of 161 in the March 12 Republican primary.

When will Trump officially get the nomination?

Tuesday's presidential elections span six time zones, and both parties allocate delegates through state and congressional district-level votes, so it could be a while before enough votes are counted for news organizations to put Biden and Trump on top.

Polls in Georgia close at 7 p.m. ET, in Mississippi at 8 p.m. ET, in Washington at 11 p.m. ET and the Hawaii GOP caucus ends at 2 a.m. ET. Wednesday.

For the Republican race, the share of non-Trump votes and the speed with which they are reported could push him to clinch the nomination on Wednesday or next week. He needs 126 of the 161 delegates awarded on Tuesday to cross the majority threshold. Mississippi has 40 delegates, Washington has 43 and Hawaii has 19 delegates to the GOP convention.

With 59 Republican delegates at stake in Georgia, he faces criminal charges for failing to win the 2020 election and other obstacles to victory in November.

Georgia allocates 42 delegates to the winner of each of its 14 congressional districts, three Republican National Committee delegates to the statewide winner and the rest to candidates receiving more than 20% of the vote.

Despite dropping out of the race last week, former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley is still on the ballot and could carry Georgia delegates statewide and in some suburban Atlanta congressional districts, meaning Trump won't officially win the nomination until Washington results. The primary will be released late Tuesday or the Hawaii caucuses will be announced Wednesday morning.

It's also possible that Haley could win enough delegates Tuesday in all races to deny Trump an official victory until next week's elections.

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