Monkey pox was diagnosed in the Boston Public Schools community

Health and school leaders are notifying families that an “adult member” of the Boston Public School District community has been diagnosed with monkeypox. Officials said the affected school building was disinfected over the weekend. Reports sent to families and provided to NewsCenter 5 did not identify the school where the victim worked or their job title. The district pointed out, “If you do not receive a personal call or a specific school communication, your school community will not be affected.” Officials said the victim will be isolated until it is safe to be in public. “A case has been identified in an adult at one of our schools and contact tracing has been done. There is limited exposure and everyone in need is being contacted for resources and vaccinations, which are available in abundance. Be aware,” Mayor Michael Wu said Monday morning. “The health and well-being of our students and staff is our priority,” the school district said in a statement. “We are following the guidance provided by local, state and federal health officials and are actively working with our partners at the Boston Public Health Authority. We are deeply committed to transparency and are taking all necessary precautions.” The virus does not spread easily. Between people, people can spread the infection once symptoms appear. Transmission is by direct contact with body fluids and monkey sores, by touching objects contaminated with fluids or sores (clothing, bedding, etc.), or by respiratory droplets with prolonged face-to-face contact. “An employee with monkey fever is not expected to lead to transmission within a school,” Tufts said. said Dr. Shira Doran, an epidemiologist at the medical center. Early symptoms of monkeypox include fever, headache, sore throat, and swollen lymph nodes, but a rash can also occur. will be the first symptom. The rash starts out flat, raises, fills with clear fluid (vesicles), and then turns into blisters (pus-filled). A person with canker sores may have multiple lesions or they may have only a few lesions. Anyone who believes they may have mumps should be isolated, but if they must leave their home, they should wear a mask and cover any rashes or sores when they are around others. People living with or caring for someone with monkeypox should wear a mask and disposable gloves if they have to come into direct contact with the lesions, and when handling clothing or bedding if the person is unable to do so. They should wash their hands regularly, especially after contact with an infected person or their clothes, bed sheets, towels and other items or surfaces they have touched. Full Statement to BPS Families: Dear BPS Families, The health and well-being of our students and staff is a top priority. With this in mind, we would like to share with you an important piece of information that the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) informed us of an adult case of monkeypox in our BPS community. We have worked closely with BPHC and the victim. Identify and notify exposed persons. We have worked closely with the affected school community to share this information. If you do not receive a personal invitation or specific school contact, your school community will not be affected. We share this information in accordance with our commitment to transparency and educational awareness. In general, the risk of rabies spreading to the community is very low. This can be hard to process, especially after the last several years of school, to know that we love you and are here for you. We promise that we are doing everything we can to ensure the health and safety of all our schools. More information about monkeypox can be found on the City of Boston’s website. As recommended by BPHC, the affected person stays at home (isolates) and is safe to be with others. BPHC will provide vaccinations to those we identify as exposed contacts. As long as there are no symptoms associated with monkeypox, exposed contacts may continue their normal activities. This weekend, we cleaned and disinfected the entire affected school building as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). You updated. Thank you for your continued partnership in making all our schools healthy, safe and welcoming places for all our students and staff.

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Health and school leaders are notifying families that an “adult member” of the Boston Public School District community has been diagnosed with monkeypox.

Officials said the affected school building was disinfected over the weekend. Reports sent to families and provided to NewsCenter 5 did not identify the school where the victim worked or their job title.

“If you do not receive a personal invitation or specific school communications, your school community will not be affected,” the district pointed out.

Officials said the victim will be isolated in public until he is safe.

“A case has been identified in an adult at one of our schools and contact tracing has been done. There is limited exposure and everyone in need is being contacted for resources and vaccinations, which are available in abundance. Be aware,” Mayor Michael Wu said Monday morning.

“The health and well-being of our students and staff is our priority,” the school district said in a statement. “We are following the guidance provided by local, state and federal health officials and are actively working with our partners at the Boston Public Health Authority. We are deeply committed to transparency and are taking all necessary precautions.”

Although the virus does not spread easily between people, people can spread the infection once symptoms appear. Transmission occurs by direct contact with body fluids and canker sores, by touching objects contaminated with fluids or sores (clothing, bedding, etc.), or by respiratory droplets after prolonged face-to-face contact.

“An employee working with a monkey box is not expected to lead to transmission within a school,” said Dr. Shira Doran, a Tufts Medical Center epidemiologist.

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Early symptoms of monkeypox include fever, headache, sore throat and swollen lymph nodes, but a rash may be the first symptom. The rash starts out flat, raises, fills with clear fluid (vesicles), and then turns into blisters (pus-filled). A person infected with monkeypox may have multiple lesions or only a few.

Anyone who believes they may have monkeypox should self-isolate, but if they must leave their home, they should wear a mask and cover their rash or sores when around others.

People living with or caring for someone with monkeypox should wear a mask and disposable gloves if they have to come into direct contact with the lesions, and when handling clothing or bedding if the person is unable to do so. They should wash their hands regularly, especially after contact with an infected person or their clothes, bed sheets, towels and other items or surfaces they have touched.


Full report sent to BPS families:

Dear BPS Families,

The health and well-being of our students and staff is a top priority. With this in mind, we would like to share with you an important piece of information that the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) informed us of an adult case of monkeypox in our BPS community.

We have worked closely with BPHC and the affected person to identify and notify exposed individuals. We have worked closely with the affected school community to share this information.

If you do not receive a personal invitation or specific school contact, your school community will not be affected. We share this information in accordance with our commitment to transparency and educational awareness.

In general, the risk of transmission of monkeypox to the community is very low.

Although this is hard to process, especially after the last several school years, we want you to know that we are here for you. We promise that we are doing everything we can to ensure the health and safety of all our schools.

More information about monkey flu can be found on the City of Boston’s website.

As recommended by the BPHC, the affected person stays at home (in isolation) until they are safe with others. BPHC will provide vaccinations to those we identify as exposed contacts. Exposed contacts may continue their normal activities as long as they do not have symptoms similar to monkeypox.

This weekend, we cleaned and disinfected the entire affected school building as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

We will keep you updated. Thank you for your continued partnership in making all our schools healthy, safe and welcoming places for all our students and staff.

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